Tuesday, August 22, 2017













Narwhal:
Revealing an Arctic Legend
By William Fitzhugh and Martin Nweeia

260 pages, 8.5 x 11.25"
Illustrated thoughout
Available November 2017

ISBN 978-0-9967480-1-8
$30.00 paperback


Few animals on the planet inspire the sense of wonder evoked by the narwhal. The ‘Arctic unicorn’ is everyone’s version of “awesome” and “cool.”  Explorers, aristocrats, artists and scientists celebrate this elusive whale and its extraordinary tusk. From Flemish unicorn tapestries, Inuit legends and traditional knowledge, and the research of devoted scientists, comes a tale of discovery reported here from  the top of the world, a place where climate change is rapidly transforming one of the harshest environments on earth.  How did the narwhal tusk become the horn of the fabled unicorn? What treasures do the Inuit hold about this majestic but elusive denizen? What have scientists discovered about the function of its tusk?

Explore with whale biologists as they capture live narwhals to answer questions of narwhal biology, migration, population and behavior. Ponder the evolutionary history of the narwhal through paleontology and genetic science. Contemplate the fate of northern regions, animals, and peoples in a rapidly warming Arctic. Experience the insights and observations of Inuit hunters who have lived with the narwhal for thousands of years. The following pages present their views along with the latest research in narwhal biology, art, and climate science illustrated by more than a dozen photographers and graphic artists. 

William W. Fitzhugh is a Smithsonian anthropologist who directs the Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and serves as a visiting professor at Dartmouth College. His archaeological research investigates the history of Arctic peoples and cultures and the impacts of climate change and European contacts throughout northern Eurasia and North America. Recent research includes studies of Basque-Inuit contact and Mongolian Bronze Age art.
Dr. Martin Nweeia has devoted 18 years to studies of narwhal tusk function discovering its sensory ability.  The Harvard-Case Western Reserve-Smithsonian affiliated scientist worked with Inuit elders and hunters, and over 78 collaborating scientists in 8 countries in an effort that brought together Inuit traditional knowledge and scientific applications that led to his discoveries.

A co-publication with the Arctic Studies Center, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

Tuesday, March 28, 2017










Ivalu's Color
By Nauja Lynge

Afterword by Iben Bjørnsson
224 pages, 5.25 x 8.25"
Available June 2017

ISBN 978-0-9967480-0-1
$24.95



Nauja Lynge’s novel is a call for temperance in Greenland's rush for independence from Denmark.

Greenland, circa 2015. Three women are found murdered in the capital city Nuuk. Ongoing issues in the country involving the desire for independence from the Kingdom of Denmark are redirected, as race and gender recolor the scene, and the mystery unravels in clashing graphic detail. An intertwined story of corruption, greed, domination, and sovereignty reveals itself through the discoveries of three investigators— Russian, Chinese, and a Danish Greenlander. The politics at hand are reenacted in the very act of investigating the murders, revealing the Inuit of Greenland as the true and only victims of this crime. 


Nauja Lynge is the great granddaughter of Henrik Lund, author of Greenland’s national anthem, and granddaughter of Hans Lynge, who promoted increased Greenlandic independence in a time before the Home Rule government. She left Greenland for Denmark as a child, but returned to reclaim her native identity as a Danish Greenlander. Through this journey home, Nauja has seen the effects of cultural stereotypes affecting the economy, language, and very heart of those torn between two worlds. She continues to actively work towards helping Greenlanders gain their due rights. This is her first novel. 

The Meaning of Ice available in paperback, and translated into Inuktitut, Greenlandic and Inupiaq, July 2017


                                                                                                                                                                                                           









The Meaning of Ice:
People and Sea Ice in Three
Arctic Communities

Available in paperback, July 2017

ISBN 978-0-9961938-5-6
$30












Inuktitut edition
translated by Jukeepa Hainnu

Available in July 2017
ISBN 978-0-9961938-8-7
$30











Inupiaq edition
translated by Leona Simmonds Okakok

Available in July 2017
ISBN 978-0-9961938-7-0
$30











Greenlandic edition
translated by Kelly Berthelsen

Available in July 2017
ISBN 978-0-9961938-6-3
$30

Wednesday, October 26, 2016











Tuumarsi 
by Fredrik Nielsen

Translated by Torben Hutchings

$19.95 paperback
128 pages, 4.25 x 7.5"
ISBN 978-0-9961938-3-2



Famine moves a Greenlandic family into a new settlement in the 1850s where the joys and tragedies of pre-Christian times are depicted.

Tuumarsi is a realistic depiction of the struggle for survival. The psyche and humor of the people is seen from Nielsen’s own experiences among them. A famine causes a family to pick up and relocate to fairer hunting grounds. The struggle among the settlement members to make their lives better illustrates what was to become Greenland’s desire for sovereignty from Denmark. 

Funded in part by the Danish Arts Foundation.












Kayakmen
Tales of Greenland's Seal Hunters

Collected by Signe Rink
Translated by Torben Hutchings

$19.95, paperback
128 pages, 4.25 x 7.5"
ISBN 978-0-9961938-4-9



Transcribed directly from hunters, the stories described here relate adventures in the hazardous environment of Greenland in the mid-19th century.

Greenlanders gained reliable social entertainment from the oral retelling of their legends. With the only printed material available at the time being of Christian origin, interest grew for Greenlandic stories, leading to the formation of Atuagagdliutit– the first, and still published, periodical in the country. The stories collected in Kayakmen originally appeared there. This text represents  a first hand account of the civilization of Greenlanders depicting a true picture of their age. 

Funded in part by a grant from the Danish Arts Foundation.

Monday, March 7, 2016

  







Inuit Poems and Songs
Folk Poetry of East Greenland

Edited and Introduction by William Thalbitzer                                   Translated by Torben Hutchings

$19.95, paperback
128 pages, 4.25 x 7.5"
ISBN 978-0-9961938-2-5

Having devoted his life to study of the Eskimos, their language, spiritual life and religion,
Thalbitzer found in their values his own mission to search for and preserve theirs.

“These poems erupted in the East Greenlanders heart—the human sea at the outer limit of the
north—on Earth’s most desolate and rugged shores. They were found in the living tradition of
a small, recently discovered Eskimo people that I (Thalbitzer) had gone to study. For the first time
I heard their language as it sounded on people’s lips, as it must have sounded through many generations. I understood that this was part of the Inuit people’s ancient poetry, and these songs and poems deserved to be written down for greater humanity.”
From the Introduction

Equipped with the latest phonetic methods, William Thalbitzer (1873–1958) left Denmark in 1900 to spend a year in West Greenland. Throughout his research, Thalbitzer also worked to find other possible languages showing traces of kinship with the Inuit languages. He wanted to help the Greenlanders preserve their spiritual culture and hoped that his work would strengthen the values and consciousness of the indigenous community in light of increasing interaction with the dominant culture of the Danes.


Funded in part by the Danish Arts Foundation

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Voices and Images of Nunavimmiut



 The material published here is based on articles originally published in the periodicals of the Makivik Corporation, beginning in 1974 with Taqralik Magazine and continuing through the 
current Makivik Magazine. 

 The Makivik Corporation is the legal representative of Quebec’s Inuit people, established in 1978 under the terms of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, the agreement that established the institutions of Nunavik. As such, it is the heir of the Northern Quebec Inuit Association which signed the agreement with the governments of Quebec and Canada. Its principal responsibility is the administration of Inuit lands. It also has a mandate to promote the economic and social development of Inuit society in Nunavik. The Makivik Corporation is empowered to negotiate new agreements with governments on behalf of the Quebec Inuit and to represent them. Makivik promotes the preservation of Inuit culture and language as well as the health, welfare, education and relief of poverty for Inuit in their communities.











Volume 9: Politics, Part I
Introduction by Charlie Watt

James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, 
Constitution and Law

ISBN 978-0-9961938-0-1
$29.95, Cloth 
320 pages with color photographs











Volume 10: Politics, Part II
Introduction by Minnie Grey

Self Government, Land Use and International Relations

ISBN 978-0-9961938-1-8
$29.95, Cloth
320 pages with color photographs