Wednesday, October 26, 2016

by Fredrik Nielsen

Translated by Torben Hutchings

$19.95 paperback
128 pages, 4.25 x 7.5"
ISBN 978-0-9961938-3-2

Famine moves a Greenlandic family into a new settlement in the 1850s where the joys and tragedies of pre-Christian times are depicted.

Tuumarsi is a realistic depiction of the struggle for survival. The psyche and humor of the people is seen from Nielsen’s own experiences among them. A famine causes a family to pick up and relocate to fairer hunting grounds. The struggle among the settlement members to make their lives better illustrates what was to become Greenland’s desire for sovereignty from Denmark. 

Funded in part by the Danish Arts Foundation.

Tales of Greenland's Seal Hunters

Collected by Signe Rink
Translated by Torben Hutchings

$19.95, paperback
128 pages, 4.25 x 7.5"
ISBN 978-0-9961938-4-9

Transcribed directly from hunters, the stories described here relate adventures in the hazardous environment of Greenland in the mid-19th century.

Greenlanders gained reliable social entertainment from the oral retelling of their legends. With the only printed material available at the time being of Christian origin, interest grew for Greenlandic stories, leading to the formation of Atuagagdliutit– the first, and still published, periodical in the country. The stories collected in Kayakmen originally appeared there. This text represents  a first hand account of the civilization of Greenlanders depicting a true picture of their age. 

Funded in part by a grant from the Danish Arts Foundation.

Monday, March 7, 2016


Inuit Poems and Songs
Folk Poetry of East Greenland

Edited and Introduction by William Thalbitzer                                   Translated by Torben Hutchings

$19.95, paperback
128 pages, 4.25 x 7.5"
ISBN 978-0-9961938-2-5

Having devoted his life to study of the Eskimos, their language, spiritual life and religion,
Thalbitzer found in their values his own mission to search for and preserve theirs.

“These poems erupted in the East Greenlanders heart—the human sea at the outer limit of the
north—on Earth’s most desolate and rugged shores. They were found in the living tradition of
a small, recently discovered Eskimo people that I (Thalbitzer) had gone to study. For the first time
I heard their language as it sounded on people’s lips, as it must have sounded through many generations. I understood that this was part of the Inuit people’s ancient poetry, and these songs and poems deserved to be written down for greater humanity.”
From the Introduction

Equipped with the latest phonetic methods, William Thalbitzer (1873–1958) left Denmark in 1900 to spend a year in West Greenland. Throughout his research, Thalbitzer also worked to find other possible languages showing traces of kinship with the Inuit languages. He wanted to help the Greenlanders preserve their spiritual culture and hoped that his work would strengthen the values and consciousness of the indigenous community in light of increasing interaction with the dominant culture of the Danes.

Funded in part by the Danish Arts Foundation

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Voices and Images of Nunavimmiut

 The material published here is based on articles originally published in the periodicals of the Makivik Corporation, beginning in 1974 with Taqralik Magazine and continuing through the 
current Makivik Magazine. 

 The Makivik Corporation is the legal representative of Quebec’s Inuit people, established in 1978 under the terms of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, the agreement that established the institutions of Nunavik. As such, it is the heir of the Northern Quebec Inuit Association which signed the agreement with the governments of Quebec and Canada. Its principal responsibility is the administration of Inuit lands. It also has a mandate to promote the economic and social development of Inuit society in Nunavik. The Makivik Corporation is empowered to negotiate new agreements with governments on behalf of the Quebec Inuit and to represent them. Makivik promotes the preservation of Inuit culture and language as well as the health, welfare, education and relief of poverty for Inuit in their communities.

Volume 9: Politics, Part I
Introduction by Charlie Watt

James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, 
Constitution and Law

ISBN 978-0-9961938-0-1
$29.95, Cloth 
320 pages with color photographs

Volume 10: Politics, Part II
Introduction by Minnie Grey

Self Government, Land Use and International Relations

ISBN 978-0-9961938-1-8
$29.95, Cloth
320 pages with color photographs

Singnagtugaq: A Greenlanders Dream
By Mathias Storch

160 pages, 4.25 x 7.5". Letterpress cover
Paper $19.95  ISBN 978-0-9821703-8-0
April 2016

    Published in 1915, Singnagtugaq: A Greenlanders Dream, created both furor and literary history as the first original novel in Greenlandic. Initially the book was seen as an encounter between the historic clash of good and evil–Danish colonizers and the colonized Greenlanders. The book portrays this encounter in vivid, harsh terms reflecting the time. At the end of the novel comes a vision of a future, modern Greenland, freed from colonial humiliation and poverty: the first literary expression of the desire for progress which later became so prominent in Greenlandic poetry and politics. 
    This is the first english translation.

Friday, January 9, 2015


The Diary of Johannes Hansen
Expedition to Eastern Greenland: 1884-1885
Translated by Torben Hutchings
160 pages, 4.25 x 7.5" 
Paper, $19.95      ISBN 978-0-9829155-9-2

The catechist Johannes Hansen, called Hanserak, a Greenlandic missionary, was part of Captain Gustav Holm’s well-known umiaq expedition to the east coast of Greenland (1884–1885) which passed the winter in Angmagssalik and discovered 11 Inuit communities.

His diary is a series of extremely interesting sketches of the remarkable customs and practices of the native people, and was reported in the pages of Atuagagdliutit, the first Greenlandic newspaper. This work examines the people of eastern Greenland at the later stages of the 19th century in diaristic form, but with the compassion and empathy of a native. Material of this kind is very rare and significant for understanding the longer, mostly unknown, evolution of Greenlandic culture in the midst of Danish colonization. 

Distributed by University Press of New England (

Thursday, January 8, 2015

New Titles

Voices and Images of Nunavimmiut

Nunavik's transformation from a subsistence economy to a diversified economy.

Detailed accounts of the successes and failures of the active transformation of the Inuit of Northern Quebec over the past forty years. These volumes tell the story of how a determined people, with the support of the Makivik Corporation, have become economically strong and may well play an important role in the future economic growth of both Quebec and Canada.

Volume 7: Economic Development, Part I
Introduction by Pita Aatami

Communication, Natural Resources and Tourism

ISBN 978-0-9829155-7-8
288 pages    $29.95 cloth

Volume 8: Economic Development, Part II
Introduction by Neil Greig   

Business & Investment, Housing & Construction and
Careers & Training

ISBN 978-0-9829155-8-5
288 pages   $29.95 cloth