Tuesday, August 22, 2017













Narwhal:
Revealing an Arctic Legend
By William Fitzhugh and Martin Nweeia

260 pages, 8.5 x 11.25"
Illustrated thoughout
Available November 2017

ISBN 978-0-9967480-1-8
$30.00 paperback


Few animals on the planet inspire the sense of wonder evoked by the narwhal. The ‘Arctic unicorn’ is everyone’s version of “awesome” and “cool.”  Explorers, aristocrats, artists and scientists celebrate this elusive whale and its extraordinary tusk. From Flemish unicorn tapestries, Inuit legends and traditional knowledge, and the research of devoted scientists, comes a tale of discovery reported here from  the top of the world, a place where climate change is rapidly transforming one of the harshest environments on earth.  How did the narwhal tusk become the horn of the fabled unicorn? What treasures do the Inuit hold about this majestic but elusive denizen? What have scientists discovered about the function of its tusk?

Explore with whale biologists as they capture live narwhals to answer questions of narwhal biology, migration, population and behavior. Ponder the evolutionary history of the narwhal through paleontology and genetic science. Contemplate the fate of northern regions, animals, and peoples in a rapidly warming Arctic. Experience the insights and observations of Inuit hunters who have lived with the narwhal for thousands of years. The following pages present their views along with the latest research in narwhal biology, art, and climate science illustrated by more than a dozen photographers and graphic artists. 

William W. Fitzhugh is a Smithsonian anthropologist who directs the Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and serves as a visiting professor at Dartmouth College. His archaeological research investigates the history of Arctic peoples and cultures and the impacts of climate change and European contacts throughout northern Eurasia and North America. Recent research includes studies of Basque-Inuit contact and Mongolian Bronze Age art.
Dr. Martin Nweeia has devoted 18 years to studies of narwhal tusk function discovering its sensory ability.  The Harvard-Case Western Reserve-Smithsonian affiliated scientist worked with Inuit elders and hunters, and over 78 collaborating scientists in 8 countries in an effort that brought together Inuit traditional knowledge and scientific applications that led to his discoveries.

A co-publication with the Arctic Studies Center, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

Tuesday, March 28, 2017










Ivalu's Color
By Nauja Lynge

Afterword by Iben Bjørnsson
224 pages, 5.25 x 8.25"
Available June 2017

ISBN 978-0-9967480-0-1
$24.95



Nauja Lynge’s novel is a call for temperance in Greenland's rush for independence from Denmark.

Greenland, circa 2015. Three women are found murdered in the capital city Nuuk. Ongoing issues in the country involving the desire for independence from the Kingdom of Denmark are redirected, as race and gender recolor the scene, and the mystery unravels in clashing graphic detail. An intertwined story of corruption, greed, domination, and sovereignty reveals itself through the discoveries of three investigators— Russian, Chinese, and a Danish Greenlander. The politics at hand are reenacted in the very act of investigating the murders, revealing the Inuit of Greenland as the true and only victims of this crime. 


Nauja Lynge is the great granddaughter of Henrik Lund, author of Greenland’s national anthem, and granddaughter of Hans Lynge, who promoted increased Greenlandic independence in a time before the Home Rule government. She left Greenland for Denmark as a child, but returned to reclaim her native identity as a Danish Greenlander. Through this journey home, Nauja has seen the effects of cultural stereotypes affecting the economy, language, and very heart of those torn between two worlds. She continues to actively work towards helping Greenlanders gain their due rights. This is her first novel. 

The Meaning of Ice available in paperback, and translated into Inuktitut, Greenlandic and Inupiaq, July 2017


                                                                                                                                                                                                           









The Meaning of Ice:
People and Sea Ice in Three
Arctic Communities

Available in paperback, July 2017

ISBN 978-0-9961938-5-6
$30












Inuktitut edition
translated by Jukeepa Hainnu

Available in July 2017
ISBN 978-0-9961938-8-7
$30











Inupiaq edition
translated by Leona Simmonds Okakok

Available in July 2017
ISBN 978-0-9961938-7-0
$30











Greenlandic edition
translated by Kelly Berthelsen

Available in July 2017
ISBN 978-0-9961938-6-3
$30